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The holiday weekends will likely involve sobriety checkpoints

| Nov 10, 2020 | DUI

People can drink and drive any day of the week and any time of the year, but there are certain days that  have more risk than others. During holiday celebrations, people often have time off of work during which they attend get-togethers where alcohol flows freely.

The holidays are often a time when drunk driving crashes go up substantially. The weekend after Thanksgiving, the weekend closest to Christmas, New Year’s Eve and even the entire week between Christmas and New Year’s are times with increased risk for drunk driving crashes because more people are on the road after drinking.

Given that there is so much statistical evidence of increased drunk driving around the holidays, there will also be increased law enforcement efforts during this time – especially during the weekends.

Police officers are often out watching for drunk drivers around the holidays

The association between holidays and drunk driving is well-known, meaning that police officers will be on high alert for signs of impairments in general around the holidays. However, the holidays are also a time when drivers are more likely to encounter sobriety checkpoints or DUI roadblocks.

Basically, officers shut down a section of road in order to screen everyone who drives through them for signs of impairment. Oklahoma has a history of using sobriety checkpoints, so the potential exists for you or another member of your family to get caught up in one of these enforcement actions.

Those accused of drunk driving, whether the accusations stem from an individual traffic stop or a checkpoint, will need to explore their options for defending against those charges.